Audio Technica Ath-M50x Review

A good pair of headphones goes a long way - especially for those who are in the vlogging or podcasting business. It is crucial to be able to hear the quality you are trying to produce. It is for that important reason that we are comparing the Audio Technica Ath-M50X to other models so you know where to go to get the best bang for your buck.

Comparison Table

What Is Audio Technica Ath-M50x?

black wireless headphones

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The Audio Technica Ath-M50X is a great all-around pair of headphones even if you're not going for sound control and quality. They come with accessories that are adaptable to both users on the go who are just listening to music as well as musicians and audio editors who need to hear every sound and syllable.

The Audio Technica Ath M50X is foldable and therefore portable and also pulls in some noise cancelation without being completely closed in (which is a preferred system for some podcasters) so whether you're on the bus on in the studio, you've got great coverage (and they look stylish either way).

Product Specs

black cordless Bluetooth headphones on top of MacBook Pro

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We've hinted at some of the specs the Audio Technica Ath-M50X brings to the table, but we'll go a little more in depth here. Beyond a collapsable frame, these headphones are lightweight with well-cushioned ear pads that fit well over the ear and can rotate 90 degrees to lay flat or to adjust as well.

There are 3 cables that come with the headphones, all with a 3.5mm jack, though there is also a 1/4 inch adapter for audio gear or an interface system. This headset does not allow wireless connectivity - and we can't blame them for forgoing this option as the Bluetooth sound quality is just not up to par for what audio editors and creators need yet.

The Audio Technica Ath-M50X is marketed as a monitor headset, and it does well in that area as well as others. It is fairly neutral in sound - which is what you want from a podcasting or vlogging set - though there is a slight emphasis on the lower frequencies.

How It Compares

In order to make this comparison as straightforward as possible, we have used the following criteria to highlight unique and defining features, as well as pull out important and key information: price, durability, performance, design quality, warranty, and pros and cons. We feel that these criteria will provide the simplest most useful tools for comparison.

  • Sony WH-1000XM3
  • Beyerdynamic Amiron Wireless
  • Bose QuietComfort 35 II

Audio Technica Ath-M50x

Durability

There are pros and cons here. Because this headphone set is made of plastic, it is very lightweight and easy to wear for long recording sessions. However, the plastic also means that it is not as durable as other models featuring aluminum framing or a more solid building material as a whole. That being said, unless you plan on throwing these around, they should hold up pretty well against normal everyday use.

Performance

As we mentioned before, these tend to be more neutral than other "multi-use" headphones out there and are marketed for monitoring. While not quite studio level (there is some emphasis on the low levels), these should get the job done and have actually done very well with the mids and highs of audio as well.

Design Quality

The lightweight plastic build definitely helps here as many vloggers and podcasters have definitely felt the weight of a metal frame after 4-6+ hours of recording, editing, and replaying their audio. The cushioned headband and the padded ear muffs are definitely a plus here too - though there is a downside to the material they chose for the ear pads as they can get hot if you're in a warm area fairly quick (and no one likes sweaty ears).

The Audio Technica Ath-M50X come in a few popular and sharp color styles as well - with navy and tan leather being the most popular combination and all-black coming in a close second.

Warranty

A two-year limited warranty is slightly above the standard but not surprising for headphones that are reaching for the higher price tag. It's a good warranty, and most users haven't even needed to use it - which is great news for those considering this model.

Pros

  • Over the ear
  • Lightweight
  • Collapsable
  • Swiss army knife of headphones
  • Multiple cables and adapter

Cons

  • Ear pads can get hot
  • Plastic build is not super durable
  • Lows are slightly emphasized

Sony WH-1000XM3

For a slight jump in price, these headphones are next in our comparison. They have long since been on the favorites list for many different reasons - podcasting and vlogging included - and have definitely made their mark on the territory. As a newer model in the industry, they offer cool features like wireless capability and Quick Attention mode (which we'll go over) that have gone over well with their audience as a whole.

Durability

There is some greater durability here in terms of build, with the exception of the hinges which seem to be a little flimsy in comparison to the rest of the model. We wouldn't suggest any heavy tossing or packing for this model, which is a little disappointing for how well built the rest of the model is.

Performance

Like the Audio Technica Ath-M50X, this headphone set lives in the more neutral zone but emphasize the lows a little more than a typical studio headset would.

The Bluetooth option for this headset does pretty well in terms of Bluetooth and has a 30-foot connection range, though we still wouldn't recommend it for audio editing as it does still have the typical issues users encounter with Bluetooth. In terms of calls and music though, this is a great feature to have and the call/music buttons work well.

For the wireless option of use, battery life is surprisingly strong. You can get 5 hours of playing time from just a 15-minute charge, and a full charge is roughly 30 hours of playable time.

One handy feature we wanted to go over is the Quick Attention mode that is a tap of a button away. This allows outside noise in and allows you to hear the question someone asked, or give a quick order without undoing your entire set up. It's a great feature that not a lot of headphones have thought to offer.

Design Quality

These headphones are a little heavier than other models and can weigh on you after wearing them for long periods of time, however, they are comfortable and lighter than their predecessors. A padded headband and over the ear padded muffs make sure that not only are you comfortable but the noise stays out as well. There is a common issue with the ear muffs getting too hot though and thereby getting you sweaty.

This set is a closed back design, meaning others can't hear what you're listening to (a great feature for students who share bus space with others) and has great noise canceling - though some users have reported some adaptive issues with this feature.

Warranty

There is a standard warranty included with these headphones, and users have not had to tap into it for the most part. This means that you don't need to be wary if you're leaning towards this model.

Pros

  • Wired and wireless options
  • Quick Attention mode
  • Fully functional headset mode for calls
  • Long battery life

Cons

  • Heavier
  • Can get hot
  • Some issues with noise canceling

Beyerdynamic Amiron Wireless

This model may not be as well known to the more casual users, but it takes such a large price jump for a reason - these really are some of the best wireless headphones money can buy. They're not ideal for traveling or casual music listening though; they are meant for strict studio use and are built to perform in that area.

Durability

With such a hefty price tag, we expected these to be fairly durable - and we were not disappointed. While it should be noted that these are not meant for travel (they don't even collapse or fold in any way shape or form), for normal use, these should last you a very long time. The metal and plastic blend for the build and frame of the headphones ups that durability without completely weighing it down (more on that later).

The ear pads are also replaceable in this model, which is a great feature to have as they are often the first piece to wear out. With a model this expensive, it was a smart add-on to keep users from having to disregard to progressively become uncomfortable using a pricey set of headphones just because the pads are worn.

Performance

One of the impressive features of this model is its true neutral sound - which podcasters and vloggers will really appreciate. It doesn't emphasize highs or lows but instead provides crystal clear audio in every range (making editing a breeze). This is true whether these are wired or wireless, which is honestly a feat on its own that impressed us. There is also an accompanying app that will test your hearing and tailor sound to you.

Like the previous model, you can expect about 30 hours of battery life tor these and they charge relatively quickly as well. The controls for the headphones are unlike others you'll see in lower price ranges: a touchpad. The right earmuff features a pad that registers gestures and taps for controls and it actually works pretty well at coding everything correctly.

One downside we want to mention is that these are not for traveling - even on the bus or the walk home. They're not meant for casual music and they don't provide noise cancelation - though they do provide noise isolation, which is great for audio editing but terrible if you've got outside noise.

Design Quality

Design quality is pretty good here when rated as studio-only headphones. They are sturdy enough and long-lasting for constant use in one place. As they are not meant to travel, we're sure their design finds its flaws on the bus or in a car outside of the studio. These headphones are a litter heavier than you would expect as well - due both to the metal framing as the bulkiness of the entire set.

Warranty

There is a standard guarantee but it was surprisingly less comprehensive than we would expect for this price range. Small things weren't covered like scratches or anything that didn't influence their performance - which is an odd exclusion.

Pros

  • Great neutral sound
  • Great sound wired or wireless
  • Long battery life
  • Replaceable ear pads
  • Touchpad controls

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Not travel-friendly
  • Heavier
  • Questionable warranty

Bose QuietComfort 35 II

This headphone set is another well-loved wireless option. They focus more on the comfort and lightweight feel of their model but don't compromise on sound quality to do so. If you're familiar with the previous model, upgrading won't really bring you more sound quality, though you will get some other perks.

Durability

While there's nothing considerably praise-worthy in this section, there aren't any issues either. Don't throw these around and you should get a good life out of them, to be perfectly honest.

Performance

Sound quality is good here - maybe not on the level of the previous model, but they'll get the job done. It's a good Swiss Army knife if headphones and can play well with audio editing and casual listening. Though they don't quite stay within the neutral range of audio.

The Bluetooth quality is also sub-par for audio editing - it just will not get the job done. There is something to be said about the added Google Assistant feature though, which allows you to talk through your headphones instead of your phone. You can also re-route the button to do a number of other cool options through the app.

Design Quality

The collapsible and portable nature of these headphones will be appreciated to on the go users - as will the noise cancelation. There is also a touch of noise isolation in the fact that you won't have to speak up in order to hear yourself talk. While there are not replaceable ear pads or fancy accessories, this model does provide solid mid-range quality for a mid-range price.

Warranty

There is a standard warranty that Bose upholds well. Many users haven't even needed to use it, so don't worry too much about this model if you're leaning this way.

Pros

  • Google Assistant
  • Broad soundstage
  • Good battery life (20+ hours)Wired or wireless
  • Noise isolation

Cons

  • Bluetooth is spotty for audio editing
  • Bland look

Conclusion

Now that we've addressed some of the options in different price levels, let's get back to our original contender: the Audio Technica Ath-M50X. As the most budget-friendly option here, we have to admit that it ticks a lot of boxes in offering above par sound quality as well as plenty of features and accessories. While springing for the Amiron headphones will likely give you the best of the best in terms of stationary sound quality, we feel that the Audio Technica Ath-M50X covers the most ground (literally and figuratively) in terms of specs and price. We have to give it a 4 out 5 stars overall and can definitely recommend it to podcasters, vloggers, and casual listeners alike.

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